Fold the Flock

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Passenger Pigeons flew in vast flocks, numbering in the billions, sometimes eclipsing the sun from noon until nightfall. Flying sixty miles an hour, they migrated across their geographic range, which stretched from the northeastern and mid-western states and into Canada to the southern states.

In the 19th Century, as American’s urban population grew and the demand for wild meat increased, thousands of men became full-time pigeon hunters. With nesting sites holding unimaginable numbers, hunters slaughtered the birds with great efficiency.

The significant decline of the Passenger Pigeon was initiated in the second half of the nineteenth century when large swaths of forest were converted to agriculture.

It was inconceivable that in less than fifty years, the Passenger Pigeon would be nearly extinct.

In 1914, under the watchful eyes of her keepers, the last captive Passenger Pigeon, Martha, died in her cage at the Cincinnati Zoo.

ABOUT THE PROJECT

To help remember the Passenger Pigeon, we are folding origami pigeons to symbolically recreate the great flocks of 100 years ago.

HOW YOU CAN PARTICIPATE

Participants fold origami Passenger Pigeons and are encouraged to add their birds to our ever-growing virtual flock.  See who has contributed to Fold the Flock by going to the Participants page. Check out the pigeon count to your left and watch the flock grow!

Available for children throughout the Lost Bird Exhibition
Check out www.foldtheflock.org for more information

Non member admissions apply

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